The Princess Saves Herself in This One

32334098by Amanda Lovelace
Poetry
4 of 5 stars
Debut: March 23, 2017

My nonfiction entry of the month! There aren’t exactly any surprises in this volume but it was a satisfying read nonetheless.

This was originally self-published via CreateSpace and much like Milk and Honey, it garnered such a response that the same publisher grabbed it and put out a hard copy. This deeply personal collection explores the arduous healing process after abusive relationships and has an uplifting ending. Broken up into four sections (The Princess, The Damsel, The Queen, You) it’s only after reading the darkest parts of the earlier sections that the final one can provide universal inspiration.

A short, powerful read and one that bravely lets you step into someone else’s soul. It’s impossible to ignore the emotion and courage poured into each piece, and it’s lovely reminder that no matter the grief and loss you suffer, there are bright spaces ahead of you.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Princess Saves Herself in This One is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur – This emotional journey is tragic, beautiful, hopeful, and inspiring. I’ll be reading this many, many times.  Highly recommend – these simplistic and raw verses can speak to anyone! See my review here.
  • The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson edited by Thomas H. Johnson – Dickinson’s unique style is often well-remembered from English classes. This collection is unaltered (many collections change her punctuation or wording to “clarify” the poems), presented in chronological order, and even includes several drafts of some of her work. She explores all kinds of themes (life, death, loneliness), but the ones that hint at her unconventional life as an unmarried woman were the ones I found most interesting.
  • Classic Haiku edited by Tom Lowenstein – This collection of four haiku masters’ poems (Basho, Buson, Issa, and Shiki) is poignant, reflective, and at times surprisingly funny!
  • Moon in the Pines translated by Jonathan Clements – This has a really good intro that helps you understand and enjoy the poetry. Beautiful artwork is interspersed and there’s some brief interpretations of the poems in the back. I loved it!

The Poet’s Dog

28594336by Patricia MacLachlan
Children’s Lit
4 of 5 stars

It would be nearly impossible to write a fictional dog I won’t love. Children and dogs are expected to tug our heartstrings–in fact, typically a protagonist’s humanity and morality is judged by how they relate to children and animals! They are so universally beloved, they can feel like a literary crutch. Yet this story portrays them as you’d expect in ways that do not feel full of exploitative sugar.

When Teddy the Irish Wolfhound finds two children alone in a snowstorm, he leads them back to his cabin. For most of his life, Teddy shared the cabin with Sylvan, a poet who taught him words. Only poets and children can understand Teddy’s words, but he doesn’t mind. As the children keep Teddy company and prepare food, Teddy thinks back on his time with Sylvan and wonders what his future will hold.

Just as children have a way of seeing truths with clarity adults don’t always possess, Teddy has equally moving insights about humans. This short book is full of good and bad poetry, and what things or events spur people into creating art (and how lying to yourself makes for bad art). Honestly the only little thing that kept pulling me from the story is that the only color mentioned is red–and dogs can’t really distinguish red…but this is probably something only I would care about!

This is a quick, cozy read for the winter! If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Poet’s Dog is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Wolf Wilder by Katherine Rundell – Feo and her half-wild wolves must journey to St. Petersburg to save her mother. Naturally, things do not go entirely according to plan. See my review here.
  • Pax by Sara Pennypacker – The story of a boy and his fox who will do anything to reunite when the boy’s father and war separate them. See my review here.
  • The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo – A brave little mouse teaches everyone he encounters about honor, love, light and dark as he pursues knighthood.
  • Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley – A tear-jerking and hilarious story detailing a lonely man’s relationship with his old dachshund. For any dog-lover. See my review here.

Milk and Honey

23513349by Rupi Kaur
Poetry
5 of 5 stars

I enjoy poetry, but I never seem to make a priority of seeking it out. But I started seeing this small book of poems popping up on Instagram, and my friend Erin recommended it, so I decided to get my own copy. This is a deceptively simple, powerful collection that I will be reading many times!

This is a deeply tragic, painful story of love and heartache that will inspire any human. Told in four chapters, (the hurting, the loving, the breaking, the healing) we follow her journey of abusive relationships as she learns to break free of the cycle and love herself. Every other poem is accompanied by one of her illustrations.

Whether or not you’ve had an abusive relationship, or a romance that soured, these verses can’t help but speak to you. The poems about loving and accepting your own female body are so powerful—especially during this election cycle, which has highlighted how far we still have to go to reach gender equality.

It’s a short book, and you could probably read it in one sitting, but don’t. Savor it instead.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Milk and Honey is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Classic Haiku edited by Tom Lowenstein – This collection of four haiku masters’ poems (Basho, Buson, Issa, and Shiki) is poignant, reflective, and at times surprisingly funny!
  • The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson edited by Thomas H. Johnson – Dickinson’s unique style is often well-remembered from English classes. This collection is unaltered (many collections change her punctuation or wording to “clarify” the poems), presented in chronological order, and even includes several drafts of some of her work. She explores all kinds of themes (life, death, loneliness), but the ones that hint at her unconventional life as an unmarried woman were the ones I found most interesting.

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