What’s new this month

I’m so excited for this month’s books! Summer is a bit slower for the publishing calendar but these two caught my eye:

6/6 – Rules for Thieves – by Alexandra Ott27424750

The only reason I knew this was an MG novel is that Alli is 12. This sounds incredible! Alli is an orphan struck with a deadly curse, and to buy the cure, she must join up with the Thieves Guild and collect her annual pay. (With the help of Beck, who thinks he can get her into the guild and help her survive). The cover strongly reminds me of Megan Whalen Turner’s “The Thief” and I can only hope it’s just as good! The world-building sounds awesome and the stakes couldn’t be higher for Alli so I’m excited to see how it unfolds!

More here: Goodreads and Barnes & Noble


323330556/13 – Saints and Misfits – by S.K. Ali

To be honest, I don’t think I could better summarize this book than the jacket, so please just read this Goodreads synopsis and add this to your tbr because it sounds incredible:

“How much can you tell about a person just by looking at them?

Janna Yusuf knows a lot of people can’t figure out what to make of her…an Arab Indian-American hijabi teenager who is a Flannery O’Connor obsessed book nerd, aspiring photographer, and sometime graphic novelist is not exactly easy to put into a box.

And Janna suddenly finds herself caring what people think. Or at least what a certain boy named Jeremy thinks. Not that she would ever date him—Muslim girls don’t date. Or they shouldn’t date. Or won’t? Janna is still working all this out.

While her heart might be leading her in one direction, her mind is spinning in others. She is trying to decide what kind of person she wants to be, and what it means to be a saint, a misfit, or a monster. Except she knows a monster…one who happens to be parading around as a saint…Will she be the one to call him out on it? What will people in her tightknit Muslim community think of her then?”

More here: Goodreads and Barnes & Noble

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Wintersong

24763621by S. Jae-Jones
YA Fantasy
4 of 5 stars
Debut novel: February 7, 2017

One of my highly anticipated reads for this year! JJ co-hosts the fantastic podcast Pub(lishing)Crawl about all things writing and publishing and I have been dying to read her gothic fantasy for months. Not having seen “Labyrinth” I didn’t really know what to expect but she is so wise I knew it would good regardless, and I was not wrong!

The eldest of three, Liesl’s dark life of poverty in the Bavarian woods is only lit up by music. Her younger sister Kathe is the beautiful one, engaged to be married to Liesl’s childhood crush. Her younger brother Josef is the musical genius—the talent their parents obsess over. An upcoming audition could change his life forever. Only Josef acknowledges Liesl’s talent: composing. Josef can bring any song to life, but Liesl hears new songs in her head.

Then the Goblin King takes Kathe to become his wife, and Liesl must challenge the Lord of Mischief to save her sister, and ultimately herself.

This is a soul story. Liesl’s quest to save her sister leads her to make sacrifices that could kill her (in mind or in body) and she continues on. But her struggle to claim her identity, her music, her life, feels so deeply personal. JJ’s passion for this story is lovingly drawn on every page but it doesn’t feel like self-insertion because what Liesl fears is universal. Who doesn’t struggle with finding a sense of self and place in the world? Who doesn’t fear their own potential? It’s not often reading a novel feels so intimate without creating the feeling of intrusion. This journey Underground is slow and winding, a fitting pace for the gradual way that understanding sinks into our bones with every experience we gain. It’s a savory, personal journey that leaves you feeling as changed as Liesl.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book of goblin magic and music! If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Wintersong is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Uprooted by Naomi Novik – Agniezska is forced to serve their wizard, known as the Dragon, only to realize she has a role in saving the town from a dark forest determined to devour them. See my review here.
  • The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden – An atmospheric story in the wilderness of Rus’ with one girl facing her village’s censure as she tries to protect them from dark forces at work in their land with rituals out of favor with the new Christian church. See my review here.
  • Seraphina by Rachel Hartman – Seraphina is only passionate about music, but her post in the royal castle requires her to become a diplomat of sorts between humans and dragons. Her desire for musical recognition is tempered by the secret she hides that would ruin her. See my review here.
  • Caraval by Stephanie Garber – Scarlett enters the magical game-world of Caraval to save her sister Tella—but as the game plays out the lines between reality and entertainment are blurred. See my review here.

The Girl Who Drank the Moon

29417336by Kelly Barnhill
Children’s Lit
4 of 5 stars

I really enjoyed this middle grade adventure! The narrative style is cute (featuring stories within stories) and the chapters flew by.

There are several protagonists of varying ages who take up parts of the tale. The old Witch, Xan, who lives in the Bog. Antain, a conscientious objector to the village’s tradition of sacrificing one child a year to the Witch to keep everyone else safe. And Luna, one of the abandoned babies. Xan decides to raise Luna as her own–accidentally feeding her moonlight and filling Luna with magic.

These three stories converge and piece together the history of the sorrowful town and the Witch. Themes of when someone must grow up, what protection truly is, and each person’s responsibility to uphold human rights are deftly illustrated through the tragic and tumultuous lives of families in the town.

The magic is unpredictable, emerging in energetic, vibrant ways which I loved!Characters like swamp monster Glerk and Fyrian the Simply Enormous Dragon provide insight and comic relief as we explore the world.

I found myself connecting a lot with all these characters torn between wilfull ignorance and knowledge that brings a demand for action, and I liked how this was given so many facets. The journey sticks in your mind long afterward!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Girl Who Drank the Moon is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Night Parade by Kathryn Tanquary – Saki accidentally unleashes a death curse on her family and has just three nights to undo it with the help of mischievous spirits. See my review here.
  • Risuko by David Kudler – Risuko is just a girl who loves to climb, until a woman realizes her skills might be put to use for her country. This historical fiction highlights an interesting group of women determined to change history. See my review here.
  • Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi – Alice journeys to the strange land of Furthermore with her nemesis, Oliver, hoping to find her missing father. It’s told in a similar style to “The Girl Who Drank the Moon” with tangents, adventures, and strange magic. See my review here.

Not Quite Narwhal

30312747by Jessie Sima
Children’s Lit
5 of 5 stars
Debut novel: February 14, 2017

This little story is everything I could want in a picture book! Colorful, adorable, and full of narwhals and unicorns. I literally gasped out loud three times while reading this book, because of how adorable it is!

Kelp has never really fit in with his narwhal family and friends. His tusk isn’t as long, and he’s not a great swimmer. But then one day a current takes him to a beach where he sees strange creatures that look a lot like him!

This sweet story of acceptance is just delightful! There are some fun details tucked away on each page. A welcome escape for me that I’ll enjoy many times! I don’t often pick up picture books and definitely wanted to give this one a plug. I’m excited to see what the author/illustrator does next!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Not Quite Narwhal is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Percy and TumTum: A Tale of Two Dogs by Jill Hen – When floofy TumTum arrives in Percy’s home, he is not happy about everyone fawning over the new dog. But maybe Percy’s dislike is misplaced. This story is adorable, of course!
  • The Poet’s Dog by Patricia McLachlan – A dog saves two children in a snow storm and they spend a few days snowed in getting to know each other. Emotional and insightful, a cozy read! See my review here.
  • Fortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman – An illustrated adventure about one dad’s quest to get milk for breakfast and the mayhem that ensues along the way (including aliens).

The Brothers Grimm Vol 2: 110 Grimmer Fairy Tales

16000356by Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm
Fantasy
4 of 5 stars

Over a year later, I finally finished this volume! It’s organized just like the other one, with similar tales grouped together, but this one had fewer famous stories and a lot more obscure tales of morality and violence. I would agree that these are “grimmer” because there were more chilling stories than I recall from the first volume!

However, I have to admit that some of my favorite stories were simply hilarious! “Donkey Cabbages” in particular had me cracking up (just read it—it should be a film). This volume also featured more stories with tricksters. Peasants, women, and nobles pull hilarious (and at times vindictive) pranks on each other for the strangest reasons! Like the other anthology, I enjoyed poring over this for a few months, just reading a few tales at a time.

These volumes are pretty and they’re very small, so I’d recommend these for anyone wanting to build their fairy tale collection with limited space. If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Brothers Grimm is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Rags & Bones: Timeless Twists on Classic Fairy Tales by Melissa Marr – Takes these fairy tales and give them a modern spin from a host of talented authors! Creepy and compelling, just like the best of the Grimm stories. See my review here.
  • Cinder by Marissa Meyer – One of the more interesting fairy tale retellings, this follows Cinder the cyborg in New Beijing as the prince prepares to host a ball to find his queen. See my review here.
  • Uprooted by Naomi Novik – If you like your fantasy dark enjoy this story about a girl apprenticed to a wizard to fight off a sentient, creepy forest. See my review here.

A Conjuring of Light

29939230by V. E. Schwab
Fantasy
5 of 5 stars

The perfect ending to this series! I so rarely enjoy the last book in a series as much as the others, but this one hit all the beats I could have asked for. The end for each character felt right—probably because they all experience deep loss. Don’t worry, no spoilers!

This book picks up the instant after the cliff-hanger ending of book 2, which is perfect because I had to know what happened to Lila! She charges into White London to save Kell, and it is nonstop action from there. Essentially, Kell, Lila, Rhy, Alucard, and Holland must figure out if they can stop the warped magical incarnation Osaron before it destroys Red London in its quest for power. Of course, all the personal feuds and past history between them makes that task seem even more impossible.

Some of my favorite scenes in this series occur in this book! Lila in particular had me laughing out loud, and there are final revelations about magic in all the Londons that are clever and fun. It was probably important to include these moments to balance the relentless death and destruction. (Because it is absolutely relentless!)

Enjoy an excellent blend of dark magic, black humor, and awkward moments between these characters. It’s a bit faster-paced than the first two books and continues to build on everything I loved about the first two. Schwab stuck the landing and I can mark this trilogy as a new favorite series!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, A Conjuring of Light is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden – A slow-burn story of dark magic in the wilderness of Rus’. One girl is destined by her mother to save her village from the growing power of the Bear. The atmosphere of this story is incredible and will keep a hold on you long after the last page! See my review here.
  • Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman – Because if you can’t get enough of magical doors in London you can read about Richard and how his encounter with the strange girl named Door sets off a chain of events that threaten everyone in the city.
  • Uprooted by Naomi Novik – A wonderfully dark story of a sorcerer and a girl with unusual magical talents that must learn to work together to save their land from the evil in the heart of their forest. See my review here.
  • The Mime Order by Samantha Shannon – Even more adventures in magical futuristic London! Paige tries to gather voyants to her side as Scion’s threat grows. See my review here.

The Bear and the Nightingale

25489134by Katherine Arden
Fantasy
4 of 5 stars
Debut novel: January 10, 2017

This had a bit of a quiet debut but it delivered everything I hoped for! Plenty of Russian folklore, magic, a mysterious protagonist, and all things winter. I loved this!

Although Vasya is the main character, we follow a large cast over several years in the remote northern woods of Rus’. Vasya’s parents are beloved by their people, and everyone grieves when Vasya’s mother dies giving birth to her. When her father brings a new wife to their lands, the conflict between Christianity and the old traditions intensifies. The people, fearful of the hell their new monk preaches each week, begin to view Vasya as the daughter of a witch because of her strange ways. Her father, brother, and nurse attempt to shield Vasya both from the village’s growing hostility and the knowledge that the frost demon, the winter-king, seeks her life for his own reasons.

I came for the world and stayed for the characters. The relationship between Vasya and her older brother Alyosha was my favorite—watching them evolve from siblings that teased each other to adults that look out for each other was a satisfying and enjoyable journey. About halfway through is when the story becomes truly creepy! The winter-king, his brother the Bear, and different events in the village had me on edge until the end. (I would jump so hard if someone interrupted my reading!) The constant feeling of being watched by dark creatures or mercurial spirits soaks through each page and creates the best kind of tension. Vasya’s determination to protect her family and village despite their disapproval is a moving conflict, and I could not get enough of the winter-king!

The last page had me wistful to go back and stay in the wintery forest—this debut provides that lush experience of listening to stories by the fire at night. The writing is savory without being too flowery. This is a perfect read for snowy days!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Bear and the Nightingale is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Uprooted by Naomi Novik – A lyrical and dark tale of a girl taken by a sorcerer to learn magic. This seems foolish until she learns of the evil power festering in the kingdom’s forest, threatening to rise and destroy everything. Beautiful, funny, romantic, dark–I absolutely love this book! See my review here.
  • The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker – Chava the golem and Ahmad the jinni find themselves in New York City in 1899 through strange circumstances. Their unlikely friendship is marked by strange happenings as they try to build lives in the city of immigrants.
  • The Wolf Wilder by Katherine Rundell – If you want a bit more of the Russian winter, follow Feo’s quest to save her mother, the wolf wilder. With only her half-wild wolf pack and the help of a young soldier, Feo must journey through the forest to St. Petersburg and free her mother from unjust imprisonment. See my review here.
  • The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley – Another story featuring a girl unsure of her powers and destiny thrust into saving her kingdom from dragons and other evil forces. It has a similar mood and is one of my favorite books! It’s rare that anything I read reminds me of it. See my review here.

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