The Princess Saves Herself in This One

32334098by Amanda Lovelace
Poetry
4 of 5 stars
Debut: March 23, 2017

My nonfiction entry of the month! There aren’t exactly any surprises in this volume but it was a satisfying read nonetheless.

This was originally self-published via CreateSpace and much like Milk and Honey, it garnered such a response that the same publisher grabbed it and put out a hard copy. This deeply personal collection explores the arduous healing process after abusive relationships and has an uplifting ending. Broken up into four sections (The Princess, The Damsel, The Queen, You) it’s only after reading the darkest parts of the earlier sections that the final one can provide universal inspiration.

A short, powerful read and one that bravely lets you step into someone else’s soul. It’s impossible to ignore the emotion and courage poured into each piece, and it’s lovely reminder that no matter the grief and loss you suffer, there are bright spaces ahead of you.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Princess Saves Herself in This One is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur – This emotional journey is tragic, beautiful, hopeful, and inspiring. I’ll be reading this many, many times.  Highly recommend – these simplistic and raw verses can speak to anyone! See my review here.
  • The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson edited by Thomas H. Johnson – Dickinson’s unique style is often well-remembered from English classes. This collection is unaltered (many collections change her punctuation or wording to “clarify” the poems), presented in chronological order, and even includes several drafts of some of her work. She explores all kinds of themes (life, death, loneliness), but the ones that hint at her unconventional life as an unmarried woman were the ones I found most interesting.
  • Classic Haiku edited by Tom Lowenstein – This collection of four haiku masters’ poems (Basho, Buson, Issa, and Shiki) is poignant, reflective, and at times surprisingly funny!
  • Moon in the Pines translated by Jonathan Clements – This has a really good intro that helps you understand and enjoy the poetry. Beautiful artwork is interspersed and there’s some brief interpretations of the poems in the back. I loved it!

Memories of Silk and Straw: A Self-Portrait of Small-Town Japan

740082by Junichi Saga
Nonfiction
5 of 5 stars

My lovely CP Ella rec’d this to me for Fox Story research and it was immensely helpful! Aside from that though, I just found it to be incredibly interesting.

Informative and brutally honest, this collection of interviews details life in a poor fishing village from a variety of perspectives. It was all fascinating, and made it feel like you were there. The sections are well-organized so that you can see how the different layers and branches of the town functioned together. Each section is short as well, as the person describes a specific detail of life. This kept the narrative focused and honestly, had me wishing for even more.

Anyone fortunate enough to get anecdotes like this from grandparents or great-grandparents knows the feeling of getting a sneak peek into the past. Not what a history book tells you or what a history teacher may have tried to instill (probably with limited success, bound as they are by the “Memorize these names and dates!” teaching philosophy). These are stories from experience, and they make you feel like you were there.

This period in Japanese history was a brutally impoverished time for most people, right before industrialization created wealth for so many (though these interviews express the dubious change in societal values as well).

I’m so glad this doctor saw the value in capturing these stories and viewpoints and I would love to see more books like this one about so many regions. I enjoyed reading this a few chapters at a time–it would probably be overwhelming to read in a few days!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Memories of Silk and Straw is available on Goodreads and on Alibris’ website here. (It is currently out of print, so secondhand stores are your friend).


Similar reads:

  • Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight by Alexandra Fuller – An interesting memoir about growing up in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in the ‘70s. There are moments of humor and heartbreak as she grows to understand her mother’s alcoholism and the social issues of the time.
  • Watching the English: The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour by Kate Fox – An anthropologist’s take on the quirks of modern British society that (in my limited experience) is spot on. Often hilarious, and definitely informative!
  • Summer at Tiffany by Marjorie Hart – A really cute find I stumbled upon at the library! These stories are both funny and poignant, detailing her experiences in NYC in 1945 during a lively time in U.S. history.  Anyone who has worked in the service industry will find her snapshots interesting and relatable. Marjorie and her friend Marty were the first two women to work the shop floor at Tiffany & Co.

Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life

28814910by William Burnett
Nonfiction
4 of 5 stars

I heard an interview with the author on NPR and the process he described intrigued me, so I went out on a limb and grabbed a copy! (Pretty sure that’s the first time I’ve gotten a book rec from the radio?)

What caught my interest was the process he described briefly in the interview, which is the premise of the book here. Basically, if you aren’t happy with how your life is going in any area (work, play, love, health) there are ways to analyze what is making you unhappy and what you might be able to do to change that.

Once you know what isn’t working, you figure out if it’s a problem you can fix, or if it’s something out of your control. You brainstorm things that might be better (although this largely focuses on jobs, it highlights ways to improve your friendships and health as well). Then you try them out with limited commitment, to see if you’re right. And if you are, commit! If you aren’t, try again. In fact, you’ll probably try a lot of things, which is exactly the point!

This was basically how we decided to move to Colorado about 18 months ago. We liked being outside but we had exhausted what St. Louis had to offer. We didn’t like our jobs. We went a bunch of places wondering if there was something we’d like better, staying as long as we could and seeking out not just the tourist attractions but what a real life in different cities would be like. We had so many lists of pros and cons and “this would be ideal” vs  “this would work” and it took two years to pull off. Ultimately, we got about half of what we wanted, so a year later (after even more planning) we moved again to eliminate our commute and upgrade a couple of things and BAM! Life is pretty awesome right now!

Anyway – if you have middle-class resources and a reasonable network (or willingness to meet strangers) this will probably be helpful. It does assume having a college degree, for example. It definitely has some helpful pointers for job hunting and ways to do a personal inventory in an organized way. So for that alone, I’d say it’s worth a read!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Designing Your Life is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo – If you feel like your possessions are keeping you from living your best life, this is an interesting and effective method to decluttering your living space and ensuring each item you possess is functional and/or brings you joy. See my review here.
  • Yes Please by Amy Poehler – The comedian provides insight and humorous observations about living the best life for you and fighting your way through a male-dominated world. If you enjoy her onscreen or onstage you will enjoy this! See my review here.
  • The Book by Alan Watts – As someone who was heavily sheltered from any eastern philosophies and religions, I found this an interesting and easy intro to a different way of viewing yourself and your place in the world. It’s concise and thought-provoking.

The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Storyteller

1383168by John Truby
Nonfiction
3 of 5 stars

This came highly rec’d from many YA authors and I was excited to dive in! Especially since I hadn’t read a craft book in far too long. (If like me, you are not familiar with the author, here is more about him). What I found was a book that rang truer to the 1970s than today, despite being written in 2008…

Personally, when I am studying the mechanics of storytelling it helps me to have a broad range of examples, especially ones that subvert known patterns. Show me a variety of settings or characters or plots that take the basic principles and explore them in new ways. For a book about coming up with original stories, I found this to be very unoriginal itself, which was disappointing.

There are some good tips and nuggets of wisdom here, but the scope of “good storytelling” is so narrow it becomes distracting. Aside from a couple of Jane Austen’s works, the examples you study in each chapter are mostly white male-centric stories from the ‘70s or older. Tootsie, Casablanca, The Lord of the Rings, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Godfather, Star Wars…these are all good stories, yes, but they begin to blend together when you are discussing character arc. How many rising king/wise mentor/bromances do we need? This would bother me less if the critiques of poor storytelling were not confined to female authors (i.e. Jane Austen and Emily Bronte let their emotions get in the way of satisfying endings). Or if the only character not assigned an archetypal role in Star Wars was Princess Leia – deemed “The Princess,” which was not an archetype on Truby’s list, when it arguably could be, feminism aside. (Even R2-D2 – who does not speak – was designated a prince-magician-warrior archetype).

The eponymous 22 step process is a little muddy, mainly because 22 steps is a lot of steps, and because they can be moved around in nearly any order. (Again, I would have liked a few more examples of this bit). Studying the 22 steps individually and reviewing the prewriting exercises are the most useful things in this book. It is easy to see where your own manuscript might be lacking when you look at the key points, and there are some excellent brainstorming tips for each step.

I read this as I was beginning revisions on my rough draft, and I didn’t feel that I missed out too much. I tend to discover themes and connections through writing the first draft that I can’t plan in advance – this is a book that I think you can approach for prewriting work on a story or while you are revising to get some fresh ideas, depending on your own approach.

I found myself drawn to the key points called out in the text, and the helpful exercises at the end of each chapter and skimming the rest. Overall this was very similar to my college courses in writing. I guess I just expect a little more now!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Anatomy of Story is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Pocket Muse by Monica Wood – A collection of photos and prompts to help you scribble down a scene or short story whenever you feel like writing but do not have a guide. I love this little book!
  • The Positive / Negative / Emotion Thesauruses by Angela Ackerman – These are three invaluable guides to psychology and character motivations! Also a good way to find the most accurate and interesting way of writing your characters’ emotions and plans as they try to survive your story’s plot.
  • The Anatomy of Curiosity by Maggie Stiefvater, Tessa Gratton, Brenna Yovanoff – This presents several short stories in various states of revision with notes from real-life critique partners, so you can see how a story goes from draft to finished product.

Milk and Honey

23513349by Rupi Kaur
Poetry
5 of 5 stars

I enjoy poetry, but I never seem to make a priority of seeking it out. But I started seeing this small book of poems popping up on Instagram, and my friend Erin recommended it, so I decided to get my own copy. This is a deceptively simple, powerful collection that I will be reading many times!

This is a deeply tragic, painful story of love and heartache that will inspire any human. Told in four chapters, (the hurting, the loving, the breaking, the healing) we follow her journey of abusive relationships as she learns to break free of the cycle and love herself. Every other poem is accompanied by one of her illustrations.

Whether or not you’ve had an abusive relationship, or a romance that soured, these verses can’t help but speak to you. The poems about loving and accepting your own female body are so powerful—especially during this election cycle, which has highlighted how far we still have to go to reach gender equality.

It’s a short book, and you could probably read it in one sitting, but don’t. Savor it instead.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Milk and Honey is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Classic Haiku edited by Tom Lowenstein – This collection of four haiku masters’ poems (Basho, Buson, Issa, and Shiki) is poignant, reflective, and at times surprisingly funny!
  • The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson edited by Thomas H. Johnson – Dickinson’s unique style is often well-remembered from English classes. This collection is unaltered (many collections change her punctuation or wording to “clarify” the poems), presented in chronological order, and even includes several drafts of some of her work. She explores all kinds of themes (life, death, loneliness), but the ones that hint at her unconventional life as an unmarried woman were the ones I found most interesting.

Wild

wildby Cheryl Strayed
Nonfiction
4 of 5 stars

I first read this a year or two ago, and although I enjoyed parts of it, it wasn’t quite what I expected. I’m so glad I decided to re-read this! I was a much more judgmental person then, and I couldn’t appreciate what Strayed wrote.

When I first picked it up, I thought her book was literally her adventures on the PCT, possibly even a humorous account  of it all. There is a lot more navel-gazing than hiking, and the humor was more groan-worthy than laugh-out-loud funny. Now that I knew what to expect, I actually enjoyed this a thousand times more the second time around!

Previously, I was so caught up in how different I was from the author that I could barely restrain myself from rolling my eyes every other chapter. I’m just not the type of person to embark on a journey that huge without A) more money saved up and B) actual back-packing experience. When Strayed described all the difficulties she encountered (most of them self-induced) I grew impatient. Her journey was lost on me because I was too busy congratulating myself on being smarter than her. <–Not my best self!

My mother died when I was 23–I felt I should have more in common with Strayed, since my family came apart at the seams after that event, too. But where Strayed went off the rails for 4 years trying everything from heroin to hitch-hiking, I did almost nothing. I gave up attempting to keep my family together, and I had a husband who restrained me from ill-fated tattoo / job-quitting / alchohol abusing behaviors. The only thing stronger than my grief was my determination not to become someone who would disappoint my mother.

Wild is basically the complete opposite of how I emerged from my grief, and I can appreciate it now for another approach to the same thing.

Yes, I still rolled my eyes when she described her trail trials, but I was able to see that she was doing the same thing as she wrote about it. More importantly, I allowed myself to see the strength of this woman who found it much harder than I did to put her life back together after her mother’s death–largely because her life was much harder than mine from the start. Growth is life, and I’m glad that I’m getting better at recognizing everyone’s life experiences as valid, no matter how disimilar they are to my own. I was such a judgy reader!

I highly recommend this for anyone interested in couch travel and personal journeys!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Wild is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Turn Right at Machu Picchu by Mark Adams – The humorous misadventure of one man trying to recreate the original journey that led to the discovery of the ancient ruins.
  • The Sweet Life in Paris by David Lebovitz – A similar fish out of water story about a chef who lost everything and moved to Paris for a fresh start–without knowing much French or how to fit in as a resident of the world’s most glamorous city. Delicious recipes included!
  • A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson – A controversial account of a middle-aged guy’s attempt to hike the Appalachian Trail. Personally, not really for me, but other people enjoy it, so read some reviews and decide for yourself!
  • The Unsavvy Traveler by Rosemary Caperton (editor) – A collection of short stories by various women about their hilarious memories and the things they learned while traveling. Highly recommend!

Sleeps with Dogs: Confessions of an Animal Nanny in Over Her Head

20893966by Lindsey Grant
Nonfiction
3 of 5 stars

I became familiar with the author thanks to NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)—a nonprofit program that encourages anyone to write 50,000 words in 30 days. When I found it in 2009 it was still pretty small—their annual fundraising goal was somewhere around $100K, I think (today it’s $1.4 million). Although one of the founders had produced a book, I was a bit surprised that year after year, none of them mentioned getting something published (oh, how naïve I was, thinking that just because you worked on something for years that meant someone would buy it). So when Grant—the former program director—happily declared she’d gotten a deal, and her book was coming out last fall, I was very excited!

Although this isn’t exactly what I expected, I enjoyed reading it, especially after the first few anecdotes. I hesitate to call them “chapters”—they aren’t numbered, but they are organized chronologically for the most part. Having uprooted our lives to come to Colorado for something different, I found her dream of starting her life in San Francisco familiar in both the good and bad aspects. The lifestyle is everything you dreamed of—if only you could afford it. You have so much in common with the people! At least, you think you would, if you had time do anything besides work and take care of your pet. Your family is convinced you’ve made a mistake but they try to support you as you insist that everything is fine, don’t worry. This is a set of stories gained from chasing a dream, discovering it isn’t quite what you thought, but using the experience as your next jumping off point to do what you want to do in life.

I liked this more the further I got in the narrative, and anyone who has ever worked a service job will appreciate the level of detail devoted to these anecdotes.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Sleeps with Dogs is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Unsavvy Traveler: Women’s Comic Tales of Catastrophe by Rosemary Caperton (editor) – This collection of travel memoirs from various women describes the hilarious and trying circumstances they faced when traveling around the world. A series of “how did I get here?” moments that is very fun to read.
  • The Sweet Life in Paris: Delicious Adventures in the World’s Most Glorious – and Perplexing – City by David Lebovitz – I love this book! Aside from explaining how I managed to offend every Parisian I encountered during my brief weekend, it contains delicious recipes, especially for desserts.
  • Summer at Tiffany by Marjorie Hart – This is a cute find I stumbled upon at my library! NYC – 1945 – Marjorie and her best friend Marty arrive in the Big Apple fresh out of college and determined to make their way independently. They become the first two women hired to the Tiffany and Co. sales floor to assist with all kinds of errands. Her stories from that summer are amazing snapshots of what that time was like in America.

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