Saints and Misfits

32333055by S.K. Ali
YA Contemporary
4 of 5 stars
Debut novel: June 13, 2017

This is a perfect depiction of high school–a YA book truly written for teens, and I loved it!

Janna Yusuf is an Indian-American hijabi teen trying to fit her identity into every part of her life while making the fewest waves. But when her best friend’s cousin assaults her, she must decide if she will be the one to expose him. He’s a saint in their community, and she’s the only one who knows he’s a monster.

This is a serious novel and a heavy read, but the writing is excellent. Janna’s stress and emotional turmoil is portrayed in big and small moments. Sometimes she lashes out, sometimes she makes a surprisingly compassionate decision, but she does everything while navigating her parents’ recent divorce, her brother’s courtship with the perfect Muslim girl, and her network of friends. She learns who to trust, and what her personal beliefs are, and what forms a solid faith and what does not. Her female friendships are the brightest and lowest points of the book and I loved how true that is to high school. There are feel-good moments in this story but it doesn’t sugarcoat anything either. I rec this to anyone who enjoys YA contemporary with more nuance and reflection.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Saints and Misfits is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy – Ramona is as well-known in her small southern town for her blue hair as she is for being a lesbian. But her surety of her identity is tested when an old friend moves back and she discovers not everyone fits into a box. See my review here.
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas – Starr’s life comes under intense scrutiny from both her white high school and her black neighborhood when she witnesses the police shooting of her unarmed friend Khalil. See my review here.
  • You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner – An art-filled story of friendship–and rivalry. When Julia is expelled and becomes the only Deaf girl in a mainstream school, she throws herself into her art even more. But she unwittingly stumbles into a turf war and must figure out who is trying to push her out. See my review here.
  • Our Own Private Universe by Robin Talley – Aki has always known she is bi. At least, she’s pretty sure, even though she’s only had boyfriends. But when she develops a crush on another girl during their Mexico mission trip, she finds herself putting her theory into practice as they deepen their secret relationship. But Christa doesn’t want to keep it a secret. See my review here.’
  • Gabi, A Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero – Gabi is caught between two worlds, trying to please her traditional Mexican American family, and trying to fit in at school. Both worlds give her nothing but stress: college apps, one best friend coming out to his religious family, her pregnant sister, her father’s drug habit, and her mother’s constant advice to lose weight. Finding her voice through poetry might be the only way she survives. See my review here.
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Goldenhand

23302838by Garth Nix
YA Fantasy
4 of 5 stars

I’ve been reading about the Old Kingdom since I was….12? Sabriel (remains a favorite), Lirael, Abhorsen and then Clariel the prequel and now this one, another chapter in Lirael’s story. I love this world, I love the characters, the magic–it feels as familiar to me as our world and returning for a new story is always a cozy feeling!

Lirael is trying to fit in with her newfound royal family and manage her duties as the Abhorsen-in-Waiting. She also has to adjust to her glowing, golden hand that Sam made her, and the loss of the Disreputable Dog. Sabriel and Touchstone go on holiday to enjoy the peace–which is of course when chaos returns. Ferin is trying to reach Lirael with a vital message from the north, and Nick is trying to reach Lirael about a Free Magic creature south of the Wall, and it takes some time for these events to be linked.

Although slower than some of the other books, I found the lead-in to the inevitable meeting between them all interesting, because we learn so much more about the Old Kingdom and its inhabitants, as well as about Charter Magic.

This hit all the sweet spots I expect for a continuation of a favorite series. Although the emphasis on romance was a bit disappointing, and I’ll always hope for more of Sabriel’s adventures, this was a satisfying, enjoyable read.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Goldenhand is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman – A trilogy filled with dark magic and destiny. Lyra gets drawn into the political and religious fronts about to start a war for the freedom of human souls. It’s action-packed but thoughtful as Lyra grows up and faces her role in a prophecy that could change her world forever.
  • The Chronicles of Chrestomanci vol 1 by Diana Wynne Jones – The Chrestomanci is the nine-lived sorcerer responsible for keeping balance in the Twelve Related Worlds, but first he has to learn how that’s done. Especially if he can’t seem to do magic at all. These novellas are fun and imaginative like all of Jones’ work.
  • A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab – Kell is one of the last Antari, magicians that can travel between the four parallel worlds. Officially, he works for the king of Red London (where magic is vibrant and free) but unofficially, he smuggles objects between the worlds for those willing to pay. But when he accidentally smuggles a piece of Black London (which should be extinct) into Red London, all hell breaks loose across the four worlds. See my review here. See my review here.

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

32191710by Neil deGrasse Tyson
Nonfiction
5 of 5 stars

This is perfect for anyone like me, anyone with a lot of questions about complicated matters and who isn’t entirely sure how to Google them. I enjoyed this book and I learned a lot!

Perhaps the most charming element of this book (aside from corny humor) is that the response “We don’t know yet” is presented with excitement rather than embarrassment. The sense of wonder in this tiny volume is pervasive and infectious!

Organized roughly chronologically and small-to-large, the chapters discuss topics ranging from the origins of the universe, spheres, and chemical compounds to life on other planets, dark matter, and stars. There’s a lot of information packed into this book and it truly is ideal for picking up to read 20 pages at a time. And despite taking some of the greatest mysteries humans have encountered, it presumes only a high school level of education and is easy to understand.

Highly recommend for everyone! I’ll probably check out more of his books–somehow he’s had time to write quite a few.

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Astrophysics for People in a Hurry is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner – Another slim volume packed with bite-size insights about links between seemingly unrelated events. I really enjoyed this and it’s great for learning to organize information in your mind differently than you’d expect.
  • The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo – Another short book that ruthlessly pares down your possessions to only those that “spark joy” in you, leading to a simpler, presumably happier life. Or if not happier, definitely less stressful. See my review here.
  • The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova Bailey – Although perhaps not quite as informative on a grand scale, this is an excellent illustration of the sacredness of life in any state or size. See my review here.

The Blood – Monstress Vol. 2

33540347by Marjorie Liu (writer) and Sana Takeda (artist)
Graphic Novel
5 of 5 stars
This is a review of issues 7-12

The first volume of this comic was my top read last year and I have been waiting for this installment ever since!

Volume one was a whirlwind of characters, backstories, adventures and world-building. I fell so hard for this story I was in a tailspin for days trying to process what I’d read and the fact that I’d be waiting six months for volume two.

This world of matriarchal societies and religions is full of war and chaos and Maika Halfwolf is our access point. She is bonded to a terrifying demon/monster inside her and it is this that spurs armies to hunt her and allies to hide her as a key to–probably the apocalypse, nobody really knows. In this installment Maika is still uncovering secrets from her mother’s past and what her own identity is. We get to see much more of the world–oceans, pirates, cursed isles–and I loved all of it!

Maika’s relationship with the monster inside her takes center stage this time as we learn about its past and what might come of their strange relationship. Kippa and Master Ren refuse to abandon Maika, although her violent episodes happen more frequently. The new characters we meet endeared themselves to me instantly! And although it ends with another cliff-hanger, it’s not too harsh.

Now that the world is established I felt it was easier to sink into this volume. It wasn’t as hard to keep track of all the different forces at work. Everything I loved about the first volume was expanded upon here and I can’t wait to see how this story unfolds!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Monstress: The Blood is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Nimona by Noelle Stevenson – Decidely more lighthearted than Monstress, this explores similar themes from a quirky perspective. Nimona is a shape-shifter who apprentices herself to villain Lord Blackheart. He quickly realizes there is more to her than a desire for villainy. See my review here.
  • The Female of the Species – A YA novel that tackles a murder, rape culture, and sexism through the eyes of three senior students in a small town. See my review here.
  • Lady Snowblood: The Deep-Seated Grudge Part 1 by Kazuo Koike – An accomplished assassin, Lady Snowblood is finally ready to take down the men responsible for her family’s deaths.

What’s new this month

It’s almost time for fall releases but these are some interesting reads to tide you over til September!

329560088/1 – Sour Heart: Stories – by Jenny Zhang

A collection of seven stories about immigrants coming to terms with their families, cultures, and identity in 1990’s NYC. Renowned for her poetry, this is something new for the author and I’m intrigued the themes of family history complicating your present. This is coming out under Lena Dunham’s new imprint so I’m also guessing feminism and sexuality will be explored too. Waiting to see what else is in store with this read!

More here: Goodreads and Barnes & Noble


320517208/15 – Wicked Like a Wildfire – by Lana Popović

Two sisters, two gifts, and a secret family curse. Iris and Melina have different powers that let them control beauty. For Iris it’s glasswork, for Melina it’s music. But their mother has rules: don’t tell anyone about your gifts. Don’t fall in love. Their quiet small-town life is rocked when their mother is attacked, and the sisters begin uncovering family secrets to find out why and whether the powers that have bonded them will rip them apart. Sounds like a good debut to me!

More here: Goodreads and Barnes & Noble


327136628/16 – Crushed: A Graphic Memoir – by Trinidad Escobar

This sounds so interesting and bittersweet! The story of Trinidad’s adoption by a California family and her quest at age 25 to discover her biological family’s roots to better understand herself. While her life in America was full of love, she feels out of place, and dark visions plague her mind, distorting what’s true. When she visits the Dorognas in the Philippines, they are more than happy to give her the stories of their lives to help her piece together who she is.

More here: Goodreads and Tattered Cover


327117018/22 – Dress Codes for Small Towns – by Courtney Stevens

I met the author at an event a few months ago and what she told me about this book put it on my list! “It’s the small town from Footloose but about queer identity instead of dancing.” Preacher’s daughter Billie has her group of friends that gets into trouble and always looks out for one another. But when Janie Lee tells Billie she’s in love with Woods, Billie realizes she might be in love with both of them. I love groups of friends, I love Billie’s hesitance to mess with the group dynamic, I love that this will explore fluidity instead of labels. Sign me up!

More here: Goodreads and Barnes & Noble


323362768/29 – Wonder Woman: Warbringer – by Leigh Bardugo

I am not really a superhero fan, but I have to admit I’ve been loving the Wonder Woman projects this year! This origin story follows Diana, Princess of the Amazons and destined to become Wonder Woman, and Alia, the girl Diana saves, who is a descendant of Helen of Troy, a Warbringer. Diana’s choice to save Alia will force them to face and fight all kinds of enemies who want to decide the Warbringer’s fate. Friendship and superpowers and adventure from one of the queens of fantasy!

More here: Goodreads and Barnes & Noble

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