Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

15881by J.K. Rowling
Children’s Lit
4 of 5 stars

As a 13-year-old I just wanted Harry to make Dobby tell him the truth (I was pretty impatient as a kid!) but of course that wouldn’t be any fun! It’s so hard to be objective about these books…

Harry’s second year at Hogwarts is much darker than the first, with a mysterious monster attacking the students and petrifying them. Draco Malfoy is even more horrible in this book, and the mysterious Chamber of Secrets defies Hermione’s library researching skills. Harry is about to learn just how much the past repeats itself in the present (which feels more relevant now that I’m older). The themes of identity here are broken down from many angles–not just Harry’s fears about being a good fit for Slytherin. The students are learning what it means to be in different houses, what it means to Muggle-born or not, and if any of it truly matters. I like to think that Malfoy has some introspective moments off-page, but who can say. All we really know is that Lockhart is the only one who manages to leave this story less self-aware!

29241319Reading this again after a few years was so much fun! Harry is still adorably concerned about rule-following and making friends. He and Ron still do homework! Probably the weirdest magic in this book is Dumbledore keeping the school open while all these terrible things are happening.

The illustrations in the newest edition are charming though not as interesting as the first book’s adaptation. Admittedly, taking the whole series into account this one doesn’t rank as a favorite-favorite but it’s still magical!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


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