The Midnight Star

28588345by Marie Lu
YA Fantasy
5 of 5 stars

This is exactly what I needed during this time of uncertainty and fear—a story to remind me that no matter how many terrible things someone has done, anyone can still choose goodness at any time.

Adelina’s journey into darkness from an outcast with powerful illusions to a queen with everyone at her feet has held me spellbound since its beginning.  Her ambition and determination pits her against everyone, including her former allies and her own sister Violetta. Yet part of her longs for the love and light she remembers feeling with her sister and the thief Magiano before her desire for revenge took over.

Right after she establishes her empire, Adelina receives word from the former Young Elites leader Raffaele that her sister is dying—just like all elites will die as their godlike powers consume their mortal bodies. Reluctantly, Adelina joins forces with the former Daggers and Queen Maeve’s army on a quest to save themselves—if she doesn’t decide to betray them all first.

Just as Adelina’s journey to become queen felt both like her destiny and her fatal flaw, this quest carries the weight of selfish desires and fate.  The pacing is relentless, and the characters are caught in a whirlwind of battles within and outside of their group. This is more about how the changes they have already undergone affect their relationships now, rather than what changes await them.

This flew by for me and the ending is beautiful and perfect. As with most trilogy ends, it’s hard to say more without spoilers!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, The Midnight Star is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s website here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


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