Gabi, A Girl in Pieces

20702546by Isabel Quintero
YA Contemporary
5 of 5 stars
Debut novel – October 14, 2014

My best friend rec’d me this book (an embarrassing 5 months ago) and I finally got my hands on it. I am so glad I did! This book actually made me cry (a rarity) and it is amazing! I’ve read my share of YA high school coming of age novels, but this is unlike any of them. I wish I had read this book when I was in high school.

I was a little nervous when I opened it and realized it’s Gabi’s story as told through her diary, but this format is actually perfect. We get all the ups and downs of Gabi’s high school experience–the stress of class, homework, and peers–but Gabi has so much more going on than the average angst-ridden white student at the center of most of the YA high school novels I’ve read. Her father is a meth addict, her best friend just found out she’s pregnant, and her other friend Sebastian needs a home because his parents kicked him out for being gay. She’s overweight, and constantly guilt-ridden by well-meaning but conservative relatives about what “good girls do” and how her appearance is paramount because otherwise she won’t get married. College? That’s for White sluts. And anyone else who can afford it.

Gabi’s frustrated, elated, and insightful entries chronicle how turbulent high school is, and how difficult it is to grow up in a world of contradictions. Her sharp observations regarding feminism (i.e. a female’s place in the world, body image, and social status) feel smart without being ahead of her age group. She is an honest protagonist that wins you over again with each day’s account of her life.

An additional nice surprise is her poetry. A few poems make it into her diary and these enhance her senior year in ways that surprised me. I don’t normally enjoy poetry (not that I’ve had much exposure to it since English classes) but these were good. The strength of this book is the open language of the writing. It reminds of Kaui Hart Hemmings’ work–strong thoughts and emotions packed into seemingly simplistic thoughts that anyone could have, if they ever stopped long enough to think. I can’t recommend this enough!

If you’d like to see more reviews or buy a copy for yourself, Gabi, A Girl in Pieces is available on Goodreads and on Barnes & Noble’s store website, here. Please consider supporting your local bookstore!


Similar reads:

  • Juniors by Kaui Hart Hemmings – Speaking of her style in this review, her sparse, punchy writing is amazing, and Lea’s story of fitting in as the product of two cultures sounds similar to Gabi’s. It didn’t end up taking the direction I wanted, but you decide! See my review here.
  • Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell – I think of this as a quintessential high school coming of age story dealing with sexuality, race, and social class against the back drop of Typical American High School. See my review here.
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie – Junior doesn’t want to end up like the adults on the Spokane Indian Reservation, so he makes the leap of attending the nearby all-white high school–whose mascot is an Indian. This is probably the closest match to Gabi’s story.
  • The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly by Stephanie Oakes – When Minnow escapes the Community the night it burns down, missing her both of her hands and key knowledge about the world outside of the cult, the bigger question is what she knows about the Prophet’s death. See my review here.
  • Born Confused by Tenuja Desai Hidier – Dimple Lala struggles with her identity as the child of traditional Indian parents who finds that India is a trendy stereotype at her high school. Add in being set up with a “suitable boy”–who might not be as suitable as her parents believe–and Dimple has a lot to figure out before she graduates.
  • Hour of the Bees by Lindsay Eagar – A Mexican American family in the southwest is getting ready to sell their family ranch. Carolina feels caught between her parents’ wishes and her grandfather Serge declaring that he doesn’t want to leave his home. Then the story he’s telling Carolina about the past seems to be more real than make-believe. See my review here.
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